Blog Commenting: Why and How You Should Master It

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The not so secret weapon as you build your authority and brand is blog commenting. This is not about littering do follow blogs that you find with links or engaging in comment spam. Instead, I am talking about tapping into the attention of creators by cutting through the clutter. You first need to understand the concept of participation inequality to understand how powerful blog commenting is.

Almost all of the action in an online community can be attributed to one percent of the users, nine percent contribute a little, and 90 percent are lurkers who never contribute. This is also known as the One Percent Rule or the 90:9:1 Principle.

This can be further broken down into the lurkers who never contribute, reactors who share, comment, or participate in other ways, and creators who produce content. This concept can be seen with sites like Yelp, where 90 percent of the reviews come from one percent of the users.

Creators Are Influencers

Creators are pretty powerful if they are responsible for nearly all of the content we consume. To gain attention of a creator, people used to use email to reach out to them. The reasoning was that you could get a real boost in authority and branding if the creator were to mention you or link to your content, and thus you could attract the creator’s large audience.

Your goal is to win the attention auction as often as possible with attention at a premium. The attention of creators is the most important. Unfortunately, since they are busy creating content, doing work for clients, and answering requests, creators generally do not have much attention left over to give. But, do you know one place where they most assuredly always give their attention? That is right: the comments section of their blog.

How to Comment on a Blog

Most people are terrible at commenting on blogs, whether it is the comment spam that is overly complimentary but lacking substance or the irrelevant and often inflammatory crap you might find on YouTube videos. As creators take a few seconds to determine if your comment is interesting, you get their undivided attention.

Comments like “very helpful” or “nice post” are neither memorable nor interesting. They do absolutely nothing for you. In the future, it is unlikely you will secure the attention of the creator as they will associate you with your bland comments. People tend to get into a habit of who they will pay attention to. The less attention I pay to you now, the less likely I will pay attention to you in the future.

Your job is to add value to the content when you comment on it. This means you should come with a point of view and opinion. Or, you may link to other related content in your comment, but you should avoid always linking to your own site. You will come off as spam or a braggart.

In summary, blog comments are your opportunity to get the attention of creators, who have large audiences. Your comments should be challenging, spark conversation, mentally stimulating, and informative.