How to Create a Winning Logo

Posted on

Designing a logo is as easy as slapping together a shape or two and some type…or at least that is what some companies would have you believe. Regardless of what they say, there really is a lot more to creating a logo that will have the impact you want. A great logo design takes a lot of work. A logo must convey values, identity and more and represents an entire brand or company. That is no simple matter.

The logo design can guide future branding and design decisions and is often the most important design a company has. For a client’s or your own project, you will learn the necessary steps for creating a winning logo in this guide.

The Makings of a Good Logo

There is power in a good logo. Making it stand out, a good logo has a certain power to it, whether it includes only type or imagery or both. Uniqueness is also a prerequisite for a good logo. You do not want it to be confused with a business competitor’s logo, or any other company for that matter. A good logo should not be so complex that it cannot be recognized. You want it to be associated with a specific company simply and quickly.

As time goes by, a good logo will never look dated. Ten or twenty or more years down the road, it should still look current. This is quite difficult. Your brand should be reinforced with a good logo. The appropriate tone, feeling, and mood for your business should be conveyed. There are disadvantages and advantages to having the logo literally represent your industry type, so that is up to the business. Either way, it must support your brand.

Varieties of Logos

The three main types of logos are:

  • Literal Imagery – If it is not abundantly clear, literal logos can instantly lend meaning to a company’s name. This type of logo is especially popular among small and local businesses. This is because literal logos leave little open to interpretation and are simple to recognize. An example would be a bike shop incorporating a bike chain into their logo.
  • Abstract Imagery – Since they convey tone and mood, abstract logos are great for businesses that are diversified. What the business does is not directly conveyed with the logo. Examples of abstract imagery are McDonald’s Golden Arches, the Apple logo, and the Nike Swoosh.
  • Logotype – An adaptation or distinctive twist on an existing font or typeface is often found in the very popular logotypes. For diversified companies who are involved in multiple businesses, logotypes can be particularly useful. General Electric’s stylized GE logo is a good example of this.

To the novice designer, the creation of a logo may seem fairly straightforward. However, it is a much more involved process creating a truly exceptional logo that can stand the test of time. The key is to take your time. Hopefully, this blog entry can serve as a jumping off point for your creative process.